Reformation Day

Fall pumpkins

 

Trick or Treat. It is that time of year. Fall, pumpkins, costumes, and….of course candy!

I live in the wonderful state of Florida. Fall in Florida means there’s a little less humidity, an occasional cool breeze, and plenty of mosquitos to smack while we gather candy on October 31st. Ooooh the fondness of Fall memories growing up in Florida!

But, October 31st is truly a memorable day for reasons that go far beyond the Florida mosquitos and candy gathering. It was on October 31, 1517 that something took place in Germany that set into motion a Reformation. The Reformation A.K.A. The Protestant Reformation was a schism from the Roman Catholic Church. Simply put, the Reformation was a return to the truths of the biblical gospel.

I am quoting Sam Storms at length below:

“Let’s return to the first few years of the 16th century in order to set the stage for what happened. In order to finance the rebuilding of St. Peter’s church in Rome, Popes Julius II and Leo X sanctioned the indiscriminate sale of indulgences. In the language of Rome, indulgentia is a term for amnesty or remission of punishment, in particular, the remission of the temporal (not eternal) punishment for sin on the condition that one perform specified good works and make generous financial contributions to Rome. Only God can forgive the eternal punishment of sin, but the sinner must still endure the temporal punishment for sin, either in this life or in purgatory. This latter penalty was under the control of the papacy and priesthood. Thus, for a price, the church can reduce both the degree and duration of punishment in purgatory, both for you and your deceased loved ones who are already there.

Leading the sale of indulgences in Germany was a Dominican monk, well-known for his immorality and drunkenness, by the name of Johann Tetzel. He began his trade on the border of Saxony, at Juterbog, just a few hours from Wittenberg. Tetzel was particularly crude and mercenary in his tactics. He used poetic phrases to highlight the benefit of indulgences. For example,

“When the coin in the coffer doth ring,
The soul out of purgatory doth spring.”

Here is one excerpt from a sermon he preached:

“Indulgences are the most precious and the most noble of God’s gifts. . . . Come and I will give you letters, all properly sealed, by which even the sins that you intend to commit may be pardoned. . . . But more than this, indulgences avail not only for the living but for the dead. . . . Priest! Noble! Merchant! Wife! Youth! Maiden! Do you not hear your parents and your other friends who are dead, and who cry from the bottom of the abyss: We are suffering horrible torments! A trifling alms would deliver us; you can give it, and you will not! “

It was difficult for the people to resist Tetzel’s ingenious appeals to both selfishness and love for one’s parents. The story is told that after Tetzel made a large sum of money from the sale of indulgences in Leipzig a man approached him and asked if he could buy an indulgence for a future sin he planned on committing. Tetzel said yes, and they agreed on a price. Later the man attacked and robbed Tetzel, explaining that this was the future sin he had in mind!

Tetzel had a “fee schedule” for the forgiveness of sins:

Witchcraft – 2 ducats
Polygamy – 6 ducats
Murder – 8 ducats
Sacrilege – 9 ducats
Perjury – 9 ducats

Martin Luther lost his patience when a stumbling drunkard handed him a certificate of indulgence as warrant for his inebriated condition.

Indulgences could also be obtained by viewing or venerating certain religious relics. Luther’s prince, Frederick the Wise, owned one of the largest relic collections in the area, over 19,000 pieces, worth more than 1,900,000 days’ indulgence. Frederick’s collection included a piece of the burning bush, soot from the fiery furnace, milk from Mary’s breast, and a piece of Jesus’ crib, just to name a few. Cardinal Albrecht’s collection of relics was worth 39,245,120 days’ indulgence!

Infuriated by this blasphemous turn of events, at noon on October 31, 1517, Luther posted to the door of the castle-church at Wittenberg, 95 theses or propositions on the subject of indulgences and invited a public discussion on the topic. There was little initial response, but rapid circulation of the theses (entitled “Disputation to explain the Virtue of Indulgences”) was certain to stir things up.”  Sam Storms

Luther had no intention of starting a reformation or separating from the Roman Church. His intent was to create a conversation. Posting on the doors of the church was a common means to create a dialogue. In the sovereignty of God it did indeed create a dialogue of epic proportions. The Reformation was birthed and the restoration of the gospel we now enjoy was renewed.

It was out of the Reformation we now enjoy the 5 Solas of the Reformation.

Sola scriptura (“by Scripture alone”)

Sola fide (“by faith alone”)

Sola gratia. (“by grace alone”)

Solus Christus or Solo Christo (“In Christ alone” or “through Christ alone”)

Soli Deo gloria (“glory to God alone”)

Happy Reformation Day!

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2 thoughts on “Reformation Day”

  1. Bravo! Very good research and thank you for taking us back in time. Historical references, that discuss the origin all the way up to our modern day practices, are invaluable.

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